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Gaming the System: How Useful are Game-based Approaches for Crowdsourcing Content?
Dion Goh - University of Maryland, College Park
HCIL (HBK 2105)
Thursday, March 30, 2017, 12:30-1:30 pm Calendar
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Abstract

Crowdsourcing has become a major way of getting work done through an online community. In addition to employing volunteers or paid human experts, computer games are a possible means to attract participants for crowdsourcing projects. Such games are seen as a promising approach to crowdsourcing because they capitalize on people's desire for entertainment. In other words, they make crowdsourcing fun and engaging, fostering participation in the process.

This talk will introduce game-based approaches for crowdsourcing. The talk will illustrate these ideas in a specific context of crowdsourcing content, and in particular, mobile media. By blending games with crowdsourcing of mobile media, such applications provide entertainment and content is created as a result of gameplay. Nevertheless, there are challenges associated with game-based approaches for crowdsourcing since they have to meet the twin goals of entertaining users and producing quality output. Through various studies that will be presented, issues in creating these games as well as design lessons are discussed.

Bio

Dion Goh has a PhD in computer science. He is currently Associate Professor with Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), where is also the Founding and current Director of the Masters of Information Systems program in the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information. He was also the Founding Associate Chair of Graduate Studies of the school. His major areas of research are in mobile information sharing and seeking, social media perceptions and practices, and gamification techniques for shaping user perceptions and motivating behavior. Dion has led a number of funded projects in the use of gamification in mobile content sharing, the use of games for mental health interventions, human computation games for data analytics, mobile tagging, and collaborative querying.

This talk is organized by Carlea Holl-Jensen